1.3 NAG 1.3 Class Programme based on the Essential Learning Areas

9.8.2018

P & P No. 1.3

Important Note: This document is currently being reworked extensively, please see the Curriculum Leader for more information.

Class Programme Overview
“…the long view is taken: each student’s ultimate learning journey is more important than the covering of particular achievement objectives . (NZC, p 39)

The second part of the Arahunga Curriculum is the Class Programme, which is based on the Essential Learning Areas. The NZC specifies eight learning areas: English, the arts, health and physical education, learning languages, mathematics, and statistics, science, social sciences, and technology.

The NZC states on p 16, that “As language is central to learning, and English is the medium of instruction for most learning in the NZC, the importance of literacy in English can not be overstated.” In view of the learning challenges that are faced by our students, Arahunga has decided to concentrate on the learning areas of Literacy, which encompasses English, and Numeracy, which is mathematics and statistics. These areas are crucial to student independence in the future as well as mandated as being worthy of special importance and attention in National Administration Guideline 1b, which states that Boards should be “… giving priority to student achievement in literacy and numeracy.”

The other Essential Learning Areas will function as contexts of learning for an integrated Theme, to capitalize on the natural connections that exist and to emphasize the relationships between subjects, and between the skills and knowledge learned at school and those learned in the real world. It is expected that the theme chosen within a class will parallel those of other classes within the Host School, to allow opportunities for meaningful shared learning.

Overall, we want to ensure effective learning opportunities which:

are relevant to pupil’s day to day reality and have a clear meaning and purpose for them
take into account pupils interests, aptitudes, experiences, and skills and engage the whole pupil
are interactive, encouraging exploration and problem solving through partnership and dialogue between peers and between pupils and teachers
are intrinsically motivating, promoting pupil initiation and facilitating self assessment through shared performance criteria
There are differences in how this will be done at Arahunga depending on the age and needs of the students/class involved, and the learning setting they are part of. As the NZC says (p. 39), schools “… should recognize that as all students are individuals, their learning may call for different approaches, different resourcing and different goals…” NZC p. 39

The Intermediate, Secondary and Senior classes of the school are not expected to be studying an Integrated Theme and may instead be involved in specialist subjects in the mainstream alongside their peers, completing SPEC modules, or involved in STAR courses and work experience as part of their transition to the world beyond school. The focus of SPEC meets the requirements above (see bullets ) and also assists students to become more independent and self-motivated, all important at this stage of their schooling.

Literacy at Arahunga School

IMPORTANT NOTE: The below infomation is modified by the new thematic units – please see the Curriculum Leader for more information.

Definitions:
Literacy is the development of communicative competencies. To make meaning, students need to use and understand those language forms used by society and valued by individuals. (CRSSAC)
Oral Language uses verbal and non-verbal language to communicate with and respond to others.(CRSSAC)
Written language communicates and records a message for others to interact with and respond to.(CRSSAC)
Visual language is the interaction between words and images to construct and communicate messages or ideas for others to interact with and respond to (CRSSAC).
In English, students study, use, and enjoy language and literature communicated orally, visually, or in writing. (NZC)

Why are we teaching this?
We want students to understand those language forms used by society and valued by individuals, and to be able to use a range of language forms to make and create meaning in everyday life

What are we teaching?
English is structured around two interconnected strands, each encompassing the oral, written, and visual forms of the language. The strands differentiate between the modes in which students are primarily:

Making meaning of ideas or information they receive (Listening, Reading, and Viewing)
Creating meaning for themselves or others (Speaking, Writing, and Presenting).
Modes

Strands Oral Written Visual
Making meaning Listening Reading Viewing
Creating meaning Speaking Writing Presenting
How…
Programme Elements:
The programme elements for Literacy at Arahunga are

Reading
Writing
Oral language
Visual language
It is expected that teachers will assess and plan in a termly cycle as shown in the table below. Within each term, the class progamme will focus on the indicated programme elements, but at any time teachers will also be meeting students needs on an individual basis.
The matrices in the CRSSAC Expanded Pathways series ( Expanded Pathways in Writing, in Oral Language, and in Visual Language ) are available to help guide this planning and assessment.

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Making meaning:

Written mode
Reading

Making meaning:

Written mode

Reading
Making meaning:

Written mode

Reading
Making meaning:

Written mode

Reading
Creating meaning:

Written mode

Writing
Creating meaning:

Written mode

Writing
Creating meaning:

Written mode

Writing
Creating meaning:

Written mode

Writing
Making meaning:

Oral Mode

Listening
Making meaning:

Visual Mode

Viewing
Creating meaning:

Oral Mode

Speaking
Creating meaning

Visual Mode

Presenting

Assessment Strategies and Resources
Teaching as inquiry (formative assessment) strategies include:

Identification of intended learning, and teaching strategy
Ongoing observation of student response
Adapting teaching strategy
Resetting of next learning intention and strategy
A range of assessment tools are available as follows

Oral

9 Critical Communication Skills Checklist
CRSSAC Expanded Pathways in Oral Language matrice
Oral language survey
Written
CRSSAC Expanded Pathways in Written Language matrice

Reading
Running records
Observation surveys
Draft Fuel and Launch Observation Surveys (Robin)
Fairhaven reading matrix
Visual
· CRSSAC Expanded Pathways in Visual Language matrice

Planning and Reporting

Please use the school’s unit plan format
A unit plan is to be provided for each of the targeted programme elements for the term i.e. in Term 1 there will be a unit plan in reading, another in writing and another for listening
Unit plans will include next steps learning
As part of preparing for a unit or evaluating a unit, the CRSSAC Progress Indicators should be reviewed
Individual students progress should be recorded as a global level on the unit plan
Weekly planning and Daily planning are also an expectation of the school
Numeracy at Arahunga School
IMPORTANT NOTE: This is modified by the new thematic units please see the Curriculum Leader for more information.

Theme at Arahunga School
IMPORTANT NOTE: The approach to theme studies at Arahunga is being modified currently – please see the Curriculum Leader for more information.

Definitions:
The learning associated with each area is part of a broad, general education and lays a foundation for later specialisation. Like the key competencies, this learning is both end and means: valuable in itself and valuable for the pathways it opens to other learning. (NZC p 16)
While the learning areas are presented as distinct, this should not limit the ways in which schools structure the learning experiences offered to childrn. All learning should make use of the natural connections that exist between learning areas and that link learning areas to the values and ley competencies. (NZC p 16)

Links between learning areas should be explored…(NZC p 39)

Future focused issues are a rich source of learning opportunities. They encourage the making of connections across the learning areas, values and key competencies, and they are relevant to student’s futures. (NZC p 39)

Why are we teaching this?
We want students to have a broad and general education, and to be able to make connections between their own lives and learning, and the wider world

What are we teaching?
The other Essential Learning Areas ….the arts, health and physical education, learning languages, science, social sciences, and technology…. will function as contexts of learning for an integrated Theme, to capitalize on the natural connections that exist and to emphasize the relationships between subjects, and between the skills and knowledge learned at school and those learned in the real world.
It is expected that the theme chosen within a class will parallel those of other classes within the Host School, to allow opportunities for meaningful shared learning.
“…the long view is taken: each student’s ultimate learning journey is more important than the covering of particular achievement objectives” . (NZC, pg 39)

How

Class Programme Planning Expectations:
The purpose of any kind of planning is to ensure that teaching and learning activities are effective and meaningful for our students. Planning is a process where a teacher or group of teachers reflect on the data they have about the students(s). They think about the abilities, needs and interests of an individual, a group or a class, in order to decide on the next teaching and learning experiences that will be suitable.

It is a teacher’s professional responsibility to have a well prepared, organized, structured approach to delivering focused teaching and motivating learning experiences. Timetables and all forms of planning must be easily accessed, understood and clearly displayed for the benefit of relievers and visitors to the classroom

Unit Planning:
Purposes/guidelines:

Use Arahunga School’s Literacy and Numeracy Plans
For literacy, a unit plan is to be provided for each of the targeted programme elements for the term i.e. in Term 1 there will be a unit plan in reading, another in writing and another for listening
Unit plans will include next steps learning in the form of 4 goals
As part of preparing for a unit or evaluating a unit, the CRSSAC/EHSAS Progress Indicators should be reviewed
Individual students progress should be recorded as a global level on the plan
Use your host school’s documentation for Theme Unit Plans
(Note that Cullinane and the Senior Class are not required to do Theme Unit Plans)
Please send copies of your unit plans to the office at the start of the term
Assessed Unit Plans are to be handed in at the end of Week 1 in the term following the term in which they were done.
Please ensure you keep a copy for your own records
Class Timetables
Purposes:

To ensure that available teaching time is wisely used to meet the learning needs of the students
To ensure efficient use of staffing resources to provide both safety and supervision, and maximum learning opportunities
To inform both staff and students what they are doing, when they are doing it and who they are with
To assist students to understand time and it’s passage—past, present and future
Guidelines:

Timetables must show set times for literacy and numeracy
The class timetable must be sent to the office at the beginning of each term
Students must be able to access their own timetables
This will usually mean some kind of visual timetable will need to be displayed in the classroom
Most of our students require concrete, structured timetables to allow independence to develop
Long Term Plans:

Purposes and Guidelines:

provide an overview of the intended class programmes for the term, to ensure a balanced programme is provided
include a specific focus for the term, taken from the Class Appraisal
please use Form 1.4 Long Term Plan
Weekly Planning
Guidelines

to provide an overview of the week’s programme
to enable teachers to outline daily organisation of groups and individuals, staff and students
to enable teachers to outline resources and materials to be used
to identify focused teaching opportunities
use the Fairhaven format, which is based on the weekly timetable and is completed on the comput
As already stated in the general section on planning, this must be of such a standard that it can be easily followed by relieving teachers and visitors to the classroom.

Review schedule: Within 3 years

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